The Veterans Disability Protection Act of 2010 (VDPA) seeks to protect disabled veterans in the courtroom.

The Veterans Disability Protection Act of 2010 (VDPA) seeks to protect disabled veterans in the courtroom. Disabled veterans who were injured in combat or in the line of duty receive disability compensation from the government. See article.

This compensation is supposed to be protected by federal laws, but civil court judges tend to attach the compensation to divorce lawsuits anyway. For example, sometimes when a disabled veteran gets divorced, the judge considers the disability compensation as “income” and, therefore, it becomes a divisible marital asset. They wrongfully calculate the disability compensation into a divorce settlement.

The author of the article states that this action has led some veterans to become homeless or to commit suicide. The VDPA seeks to prevent the court from being able to take the disability compensation away from the veteran – as this would be unfair and cruel. This Act declares that all of the disability compensation will go to the disabled veteran and no one else. The court would not be able to attach the compensation to any other kind of “income” in these cases. The passage of the VDPA would “affect every man or woman injured in the line of duty while serving in the U.S. military, past, present, and future, and guarantee the total protection of their earned benefits – with no strings attached.”